For education purposes, the complex primary data need to be processed into a format (examples below) that is good for simple applications. Get in touch if you wish to build your own applications similar to those shown here.
  • The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment is one of two large general-purpose particle physics detectors built on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Switzerland and France. The goal of CMS is to investigate a wide range of physics, including properties of the recently discovered Higgs boson as well as searches for extra dimensions and particles that could make up dark matter.
  • ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy densities, where a phase of matter called quark-gluon plasma forms.
    The ALICE collaboration uses the 10,000-tonne ALICE detector – 26 m long, 16 m high and 16 m wide – to study quark-gluon plasma. The detector sits in a vast cavern 56 m below ground close to the village of St Genis-Pouilly in France, receiving beams from the LHC. More than 1000 scientists are part of the collaboration.
  • Access open data from the ATLAS Experiment at CERN

    The ATLAS data from 100 trillion proton collisions is now public! This marks the world's first open release of 8 TeV data, gathered from the Large Hadron Collider in 2012.

    ATLAS open data guides you through how to visualise the data, how to download and use the data, and even provide s open-source software for you to make your own discoveries. Get started now!

    ATLAS open data
  • The LHCb (Large Hadron Collider beauty) experiment aims to record the decay of particles containing b and anti-b quarks, known as B mesons. The detector is designed to gather information about the identity, trajectory, momentum and energy of each particle.
The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment is one of two large general-purpose particle physics detectors built on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Switzerland and France. The goal of CMS is to investigate a wide range of physics, including properties of the recently discovered Higgs boson as well as searches for extra dimensions and particles that could make up dark matter.
ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy densities, where a phase of matter called quark-gluon plasma forms.
The ALICE collaboration uses the 10,000-tonne ALICE detector – 26 m long, 16 m high and 16 m wide – to study quark-gluon plasma. The detector sits in a vast cavern 56 m below ground close to the village of St Genis-Pouilly in France, receiving beams from the LHC. More than 1000 scientists are part of the collaboration.
The LHCb (Large Hadron Collider beauty) experiment aims to record the decay of particles containing b and anti-b quarks, known as B mesons. The detector is designed to gather information about the identity, trajectory, momentum and energy of each particle.